Unique Scientist: Dr. Alessandro Crimi

Time to meet Dr. Alessandro Crimi (He/him)! Alessandro is a researcher and lecturer from Switzerland interested in medical imaging and prediction of deseases such as glioma and multiple sclerosis.

What kind of scientist are you?
I look for biomarkers of efficacy in treatment for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson in images (MRI, microscopy, etc). In my research I mostly consider a brain as a connectome, which is the representation of the brain as a graph, obtained by magnetic resonance imaging or microscopy.

What made you want to become a scientist?
The playfulness. After all science is being playful looking at things critically. Indeed we can play forever, but by the end of the day we need something useful.

“Sciences have traditionally been kept apart from the arts, enclosed in a sterile space where anything missing a reference and a standard solution has no right to exist.”

Dr. Alessandro Crimi

What makes you a #UniqueScientist?
In my career I have also mixed traditional science with projects in low-income countries mostly related to #prenatal care. Now I am working on creating a startup which can combine all those elements.⠀

What’s something cool you do outside of work?
I am also interested in #SciArt, the intersection of science and art. Sciences have traditionally been kept apart from the arts, enclosed in a sterile space where anything missing a reference and a standard solution has no right to exist. And it is the same in the artistic realm, while those can be combined instead.

If you had one wish and could change anything in science, what would it be?
The review system is very bad. Enormous amount of time waiting, many things are made just to please business of editorial system, and “the paper” is maybe an outdated way of reporting science.

“I found that the best part of my PhD was to learn to think critically, to doubt first of all on what you are doing.”

Dr. Alessandro Crimi

Who has inspired you the most in your journey to where you are now?
All my mentors, especially during my PhD. I found that the best part of my PhD was to learn to think critically, to doubt first of all on what you are doing. Very often we advocate and idea, we promote it and we are blind on the weaknesses. I am very thankful to the people who taught me, often in the hard-way that what I was doing was wrong or not better than existing solutions, and also at being critic towards the work of other people for the same reasons.

Let’s end on a high note! What’s something you’ve done this week that you’re proud of?
Feeding a fox with cookies

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