Unique Scientist: Evelyn Bordeaux

Say hello to meet Evelyn Bordeaux (She/her)! Evelyn is a Ph.D. student in the Sikora Lab at University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus studying cancer biology!

What kind of scientist are you?
I am currently a PhD student at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. I am studying the unique biology of Invasive Lobular Carcinoma (ILC), an understudied histological subtype breast cancer. After graduation, I want to pursue a career in science policy and advocacy work, specifically related to women’s and transgender healthcare and rights.

What made you want to become a scientist?
I wanted to become a scientist because I love puzzles — both solving them and the process of solving them. This love has evolved into a passion for science communication and policy advocacy — communication about how this “puzzle solving process” occurs and the #UniqueScientists who are doing it is very important to me.

“I want science to be more accessible to all, and I think that starts with an open and clear line of communication.”

Evelyn Bordeaux

What makes you a #UniqueScientist?
I am a bisexual woman in science. I have multiple tattoos and piercings and my hobbies include circus aerial arts and pole dancing.

What’s something cool you do outside of work?
I am a circus aerialist! I both train and perform around Denver, Colorado, and my favorite apparatus is the lyra (aka aerial hoop). When I’m not in the lab, you can find me hanging upside down in the air!

“I am a circus aerialist! […] When I’m not in the lab, you can find me hanging upside down in the air!”

Evelyn Bordeaux

If you had one wish and could change anything in science, what would it be?
I would improve communication between scientists and non-scientists. Often scientists are not specifically trained to communicate their research in “layman’s terms” because this largely hasn’t been seen as a priority, leading to harmful miscommunication or lack of communication all together. I want science to be more accessible to all, and I think that starts with an open and clear line of communication.

Who has inspired you the most in your journey to where you are now?
My undergraduate research mentor, Dr. Katie Frato, inspired and encouraged my love of research and also my pride in being a unique individual. She is a main reason I felt confident enough to apply for grad school, and always takes time to meet when I am back in town to discuss my science and also just how I am doing as a person.

Let’s end on a high note! What’s something you’ve done this week that you’re proud of?
This week I finally got into this move on the lyra called a “meathook.” It’s just as difficult and painful as the name implies – I’ve been working on it forever and I finally did it this week.


#WomenInSTEM, #QueerInSTEM, #BiInSci

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